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The Frog and the Lily Pond

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There's an old logic problem about a frog that's trying to get from his lily pad in the middle of the pond to the pond's edge.  Each jump he takes is exactly half the distance of the previous jump, so (at least in theory) he never quite gets to his destination.
That's what the previous weeks have felt like: every time we thought we were there with the 'final' version of the book cover and text, some minor 'gotcha' would jump up and bite us.  Probably things that the reader wouldn't even notice- but we'd know they were there.

We even discovered a mistake in which a case study mentioned a name correctly the first time, then got it wrong on three subsequent occasions.  Not a spelling or grammatical mistake, but one of those things that you can read again and again and not notice, because the brain sees what it wants to see.  Then, suddenly, seeing it out of context in a pdf file on screen, the mistake almost jumps out and grabs you by the throat.

Anyway, job done. Files uploaded and proofs on the way.

So while we're on the subject of frogs, lily ponds and conundrums, here's one for all you proof readers out there.

I first read the following sentence aged about eleven in a well thumbed green cloth bound 'What Every Boy Should Know' type of book compiled specifically for the Sons of the Empire (I wish I could lay my hands on a copy today, just for old time's sake).  I could make neither hide nor hair of it then or for years after, even when I saw the suggested result.  Only when I heard the problem aired on radio did I 'get it'.

So here it is. The following can be punctuated as a single sentence to make it read correctly and sensibly:

Newton where Perle had had had had had had had had had had had had been correct

Yes it can. Answers in a future blog, and I might even put up an audio file in my best voiceover voice to help you interpret the answer.

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Guest Friday, 15 December 2017

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